Results tagged ‘ edgar martinez ’

Baseball’s Best Latino Players By Number

clemente.jpgSince 1929 when the New York Yankees and the Cleveland Indians were the first major league clubs to wear uniform numbers, players have been marked forever by their jersey numbers.

In Yankee Stadium at Monument Park you can see all the famous numbers that have been immortalize by such names as Billy Martin, Babe Ruth, JoeDiMaggio, Lou Gehrig, Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, Don Mattingly and Reggie Jackson.

The most famous no. 8 ever in Baltimore Orioles history was Cal Ripken. In Boston the most notable no. 9 ever was Ted Williams. No fan in Philly have forgotten that no. 20 was property of Mike Schmidt.

In Pittsburgh never has been forgotten the no. 8 Willie Stargell and number 21 Roberto Clemente.

Every franchise has its own history. Every fan is loyal to their favorite player’s number. When I pitched in the little leagues I was no. 30 in honor of Nolan Ryan. When my pitching young days were over my jersey number was no. 8 in honor of Dickie Thon.

This is my list of numbers that have been immortalize by latinos in Major League Baseball history:

0-Rey Ordoñez
1-Luis Castillo
2-Hanley Ramírez
3-Alex Rodriguez (Seattle Mariners-Texas Rangers))
5-Albert Pujols
6-Tony Oliva
7-Ivan Rodríguez
8-Dickie Thon
9-Minnie Miñoso
10-Miguel Tejada
11-Luis Aparicio, Edgar Martinez, George Bell
12-Roberto Alomar
13-Alex Rodriguez (New York Yankees), Dave Concepcion, Omar Vizquel
14-Andres Galarraga
15-Carlos Beltran
18-Moises Alou, Omar Moreno
19-Juan Gonzalez, Bert Campaneris
20- Jorge Posada
21-Roberto Clemente, Sammy Sosa, Ruben Sierra, Carlos Delgado (New York Mets)
24-Tany Perez, Manny Ramirez, Miguel Cabrera
25-Jose Cruz, Rafael Palmeiro, Mike Lowell, Carlos Delgado (Toronto Blue Jays)
27-Juan Marichal, Vladimir Guerrero
29-Rod Carew
30-Orlando Cepeda, Dennis Martinez, Magglio Ordoñez
34-David Ortiz, Fernando Valenzuela
35-Mike Cuellar
40-Bartolo Colón
41-Victor Martínez
42-Mariano Rivera
45-Pedro Martínez, Carlos Lee. John Candelaria
46-Tony Armas Sr.
51-Bernie Williams
53-Bobby Abreu
55-Fausto Carmona
57-Francisco Rodriguez
61-Livan Hernández
63-Rafael Betancourt
74-Ugueth Urbina

MLB’ Best Latino Players Last 20 Seasons

Ivan Rodriguez.jpgESPN is celebrating 20 years of covering Major League Baseball and the network asked fans to vote for their all-time team of the last 20 seasons.

At this moment, fans are being asked to pick the winners for each position.

Not surprisingly, winning names in this national poll have been Edgar Martinez as the top DH, Albert Pujols top first baseman, Ivan Rodriguez as top catcher, and Mariano Rivera as the top closer in the last 20 years.

All players from Latin America.

For the last 23 years I have been covering the Major League Baseball beat of the Puerto Rican and Latin American players, and over that time I have seen a bunch of great players.

I’ve also seen how appealing they are to their fans. I have seen how hall-of-famers Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda, Tany Perez, Luis Aparicio, Rod Carew, and Juan Marichal are perceived as never-gone heroes in the respective towns they played in in their hey-days.

Nowadays players like Albert Pujols, Hanley Ramirez, Manny Ramirez, Johan Santana and many others are closely watched and being regarded as the No. 1 players of their respective franchises.

Quite different to ESPN’ SportsNation Poll, I will share whom I believe are the best Latino players the last 20 years. Most possibly readers will have have a different opinion, but this is my own Latino All-Star team.

Catchers-Santos Alomar Jr., Javier López, Jorge Posada, Iván Rodríguez, Benito Santiago

First Base-Miguel Cabrera, Carlos Delgado, Andrés Galarraga, Rafael Palmeiro, Albert Pujols

Second Base-Roberto Alomar, Carlos Baerga, Julio Franco

Third Base-Vinny Castilla, Mike Lowell, Alex Rodríguez

Shortstop-Hanley Ramirez, José Reyes, Miguel Tejada, Omar Vizquel

Outfielders-Bobby Abreu, Carlos Beltran, José Canseco, Juan González, Vladimir Guerrero, Magglio Ordoñez, Sammy Sosa, Bernie Williams

Pitchers-Pedro Martinez, Johan Santana

Closers-Mariano Rivera, Francisco Rodriguez

Designated Hitter-Edgar Martinez, David Ortiz

Roberto Alomar and Edgar Martinez: First Ballot Hall of Famers ?


Once upon a time Puerto Ricans used to chat about just two boricuas Roberto Clemente and Orlando Cepeda being in baseball Hall of Fame. If dream comes true like a fairy tale story this same time around next year we can be praising two more.

That fantasy could be reality next December when members of the Baseball Writers Association of America will receive ballots that list candidates eligible for induction into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

With historical and stats records furnished to them and with their own perception of greatness to back up their judgement, there should be great hope in Puerto Rico the writers wii consider our own Roberto Alomar and Edgar Martinez.

In my opinion, their career records should assure them of gaining acceptance and earning plaques in Cooperstown and why not in their first year of eligibility.

Roberto Alomar was one of the biggest stars and arguably the best second baseman in the history of the game. He was a 12-time All-Star, 11 consecutive seasons from 1991-2001, in 17 major league seasons.   In the same career time he won 10 Gold Gloves, the most by a second baseman ever. In his prime he was doing everything right at second base a la Ozzie Smith did at shortstop or Brooks Robinson at third base.

Going strictly by his offense, his numbers are hall of fame too. He finished his career with a .300 batting average and among hall-of-fame comparisons he had more career hits and RBI than two other Hall-of-Fame second basemen Joe Morgan and Ryne Sandberg. Not enough ? In Alomar’s case, the most basic statistics should serve. Among all second basemen, Alomar ranks sixth in hits, seventh in runs scored,  10th in RBIs and fourth in steals. When he called it quits he was just 276 hits shy of 3,000 hits.

Among his hardware let’s not forget he was an American League Championship Series MVP (1992); All Star Game MVP (1998), two-time World Series member (1992,1993) and a four-time Silver Slugger Award. A three-time Toronto’ Player of the Year, franchise that inducted him into their Blue Jays Level of Excellence group last year and a two-time Cleveland Indians’ Player of the Year.

On the other hand, Edgar Martinez accolades are very,very long. To start, when as soon Martinez retired Major League Baseball recognized him as the greatest designated hitter of all time and renamed its yearly Designated Hitter Award as the Edgar Martinez Award. And its qualifications are his own numbers.

The 18-season veteran is only one of six in all history to have finished its career to have a batting average of .300 or more, on-base percentage of .400 or more, a slugging percentage of .500 or more, 2000 hits, 300 home runs, 500 doubles, and 1000 walks.

He is the Mariners’ all-time leader in hits (2,247), doubles (514), walks (1,283), and games played (2,055). He is also among the top 10 in other categories including at-bats (7,213), runs (1,219), home runs (309), RBI (1,261), total bases (3,718) and extra base hits (838).

He was among many recognitions a 7-time All Star, 5-time Silver Slugger, 2-time American League batting champion (1992, 1995) and won the Roberto Clemente Award (2004). He was also a two-time Mariners Player of the Year.

By the way, let’s not forget Edgar is “Señor Mariner”” not only in Seattle but in the whole Pacific Northwest. He was so cherished the Mariners waived the waiting period so they could induct him into the team hall of fame after his 2004 retirement and on the south side of Safeco Field named a street after him. Moreover, the Mariners have not issued Martínez’ #11 jersey since he retired.

Hope December arrives soon.

Roberto Alomar y Edgar Martinez: Proximos al Salón de la Fama ?


Con la ceremonia de exaltación de Jim Rice y Rickey Henderson al Salón de la Fama, año tras año uno de los debates que más sobresale entre fanaticos es quienes serán los proximos a ser electos en un futuro al gran pabellón en Cooperstown.

Entre latinoamericanos siempre surge el tema dado han pasado muchos calendarios en que ninguno ha sido electo.

Dando un paso inmediato a la proxima elección el proximo mes de diciembre  los dos primeros que deben ser de seria consideración por los miembros de la Asociación de Escritores de Béisbol de América  lo son Roberto Alomar y Edgar Martínez. Ambos boricuas estarán en la misma papeleta y ambos deberán recibir gran atención.

Robbie Alomar  sin duda alguna fue el mejor intermedista de su época. El 12 veces Todo Estrella, a la defensiva fue catalogado como el mejor segunda base en su momento y bien lo demuestran sus 10 Guantes de Oro.

Por otro lado con su madero  terminó su carrera con números muy respetables. Un promedio de bateo de por vida de .300 y entre una larga lista de reconocimientos conectó más hits y carreras impulsadas en su carrera que los miembros del Salón de la Fama Joe Morgan y Ryne Sandberg. Y nadie debe olvidar sus galardones de Más Valioso en Juego de Estrellas y en series post-temporada.

Edgar Martínez o como le conocen muchos  “El Señor Mariner” , apodo con el que le bautizaron sus seguidores en el Estado de Washington,  tuvo una gran carrera con los Marineros de Seattle.

Con los Marineros, a quienes les  fue leal por 18 campañas y nunca vistió otro uniforme, es todavía hoy su lider de todos los tiempos en partidos jugados, turnos al bate, hits, carreras impulsadas, dobles y bases por bolas.

Obtuvo dos títulos de bateo, un sín número de ocasiones fue un Todo Estrella, una super post-temporada en el año 1995 y le dió una nueva definición de excelencia al rol de bateador designado. En sus días de jugador activo obtuvo en cinco ocasiones el premio del bateador designado del año en su circuito americano.

Fue su destreza en ese trabajo que hoy muchos le consideran el mejor bateador designado de todos los tiempos. Incluso el mismo béisbol organizado le dio su nombre para la perpetuidad a partir del 2005 a tal galardón.

Su persona es tan y tan querida en Seattle que si usted hoy va a comprar su boleto por el lado sur del estadio Safeco Field usted esta caminando por el Edgar Martinez Drive.

Para algunos su rol de bateador designado a tiempo completo será de discusión ya que si los sueños de Edgar se convierten en realidad  seria el primero en la historia en tal puesto en ser electo al Salón de la Fama.

En realidad no debería ver discusión alguna porque todavía hoy es el líder de todos los tiempos en promedio de bateo, jonrones y carreras empujadas en el rol de bateador designado a tiempo completo en la historia de la Liga Americana.

Más es uno de solo seis jugadores en la historia en cerrar su carrera con sobre .300 de promedio de bateo, sobre .400 de promedio en ocasiones en base, sobre .500 de promedio de slugging, sobre 300 cuadrangulares y sobre 500 dobles conectados.

En adelante, no importando las críticas que enfrentan hoy en día, los números ofensivos de Rafael Palmeiro y Sammy Sosa son de respeto y de elegibilidad casí inmediata al recinto de los gigantes. Al presente sí mira bien las estadísticas de Palmeiro es de buena pelea decir que es el mejor bateador latinoamericano que ha pasado por la gran carpa. Por otro lado, Sosa es el hombre que debe ser considerado como el Bambino latino y todas sus marcas deben ser de consideración.

Entre peloteros activos Iván Rodríguez y Omar Vizquel  deben ser futuros hall of famers. Como igual por sus proezas desde la lomita lo deben ser Pedro Martínez y Mariano Rivera.

Hay que esperar que decidirá el béisbol organizado sobre el asunto de los esteroides. Ese es el caso de Manny Ramírez y Alex Rodríguez quienes ambos tienen los números ofensivos para estar entre los inmortales del béisbol.

Por el momento, a esperar primero por Roberto Alomar y Edgar Martinez.

 

Bernie Williams: 51 Next ?


Just a little time ago here in Miami, a group of New York media reporters and myself were talking about which great Yankee’s player should be next to have his uniform’s number retired.

The immediate answer was number 2′ Derek Jeter.

The quick response is understandable. For 14 seasons the nine-time All-Star shortstop’s long list mark of honors and accolades are not doubt hall-of-fame bound. Not counting that besides Mr. Yankee Captain since 2003 he has been twice Mr. Captain of Team USA in both editions of the World Baseball Classic. Sixteen (16) pages of Jeter’s biography in the 2009 Yankee Media Guide tells it all.

Moreover his number 2 is at the present time, the only number from 1 through 9 not yet retired at Yankee Stadium’ s Monument Park.

What about 51 ? Yes, Bernie Williams. The reaction from the same group was something like he deserves it but we totally forgot about him.

In The Big Apple who should have forgotten whom in 16 seasons was one of the Mr. Yankee. He racked up from 1991-2006 batting .297, 287 homers with 1,257 RBI’s, The Barceloneta native is among  the top 15 Yankee career batting leader in 10 offensive categories. Five-Time All-Star; Four Gold Gloves; 1996 American League Championship Series MVP and 1998 American League Batting King.

At least in Borinquen who have forgotten when Williams and catcher Jorge Posada each hit home runs from both sides of the plate in 2000 in a win at Toronto. Only time in history that wo players have hit swith-home runs in the same game. That’s good history.

Back in March after the last Puerto Rico game in the World Baseball Classic the always amiable Williams gave us this wrap-up responses to the Puerto Rico Daily Sun in South Florida.

“I felt really good about playing,” Williams said. “I am my worst critic and I didn’t feel very bad about it. It took me a while to get acclimated. But after a while, I felt very encouraged. I can still play,”

“At this point, I don’t want to be the guy that tries to come back and goes to the independent leagues or the minor leagues for a couple [of] weeks,” Williams said. “I would certainly welcome the opportunity to play in the big leagues at some point, even though the window is very short right now.”

The window never open. And even though he never said  it if he’d play for a team other than the Yankees, we really knew he would have only played for the Yankees.

Nowadays Williams, 40, is on the road on his “Moving Forward” second-album jazz tour. And we well very know he still thinks he could have been in the pinstripes uniform one more time.

Just a suggestion to the Yankees organization. Next time you invite him to play a national anthem give him finally a Bernie Williams Day like any other Yankee greats and retire his number 51 forever. And be the first Puerto Rican and Latino to be in Monument Park. Jeter can join him later.

As an extra note, if this column is read in Seattle, the Mariners should finally retire Number 11′ Edgar Martínez. His honors are very long. Then someday another Mariners’ 51 , Ichiro Suzuki.

 

This column was also published by The Puerto Rico Daily Sun / MLB Notebook

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