Archive for the ‘ Bernie Williams ’ Category

MLB’ Top 10 Latino Yankees in League Championship Series

mariano.jpgJoe Girardi is fully enjoying his first appearance in League Championship Series as the New York Yankees manager.

Hopefully he would love that his joyous ride continues all the way to the Fall Classic. However, first of all they have to beat the red hot Los Angeles Angels.

As a manager, Girardi is counting with one of each of its squad members in order to accomplish the wish of all fans, management and themselves. However, publicly he has mentioned that two very important players in order to get to the World Series are All-Star and Reliever of the Year Mariano Rivera and catcher Jorge Posada.

Both Rivera and Posada were part of the three-peat championships (1998-2000) and the not so lucky 2001 and 2003 teams. Both are part of a probable Yankee era that is getting to his end with such luminaries as Derek Jeter and Andy Pettitte.

For many years Latino players have been part of the fabric of the success of the New York Yankees. Of course, Rivera, whom probably will be a future hall of famer, and Posada are a big part of history.

This is a good moment to remember, in my opinion, are the top 10 performances by Yankee Latino players in League Championship Series action:

Bernie Williams, 1996, .474, 2 HR, 6 RBI

Bernie Williams, 1998, .381, 0 HR, 5 RBI
Orlando Hernández, 1999, 15.0 IP, 1 W, 13 SO

Mariano Rivera, 1999, 4.2 IP, 2SV, 0.00 ERA

Orlando Hernández, 2000, 15.0 IP, 2 W, 14 SO

Bernie Williams, 2000, .400, 1 HR, 3 RBI

Alfonso Soriano, 2001, .400, 1 HR, 2 RBI

Bernie Williams, 2001, .235, 3 HR, 5 RBI

Mariano Rivera, 2003, 8.0 IP, 2SV, 1.12 ERA, 6 SO

Jorge Posada, 2003, .296, 1 HR, 6 RBI

Baseball’s Best Latino Players By Number

clemente.jpgSince 1929 when the New York Yankees and the Cleveland Indians were the first major league clubs to wear uniform numbers, players have been marked forever by their jersey numbers.

In Yankee Stadium at Monument Park you can see all the famous numbers that have been immortalize by such names as Billy Martin, Babe Ruth, JoeDiMaggio, Lou Gehrig, Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, Don Mattingly and Reggie Jackson.

The most famous no. 8 ever in Baltimore Orioles history was Cal Ripken. In Boston the most notable no. 9 ever was Ted Williams. No fan in Philly have forgotten that no. 20 was property of Mike Schmidt.

In Pittsburgh never has been forgotten the no. 8 Willie Stargell and number 21 Roberto Clemente.

Every franchise has its own history. Every fan is loyal to their favorite player’s number. When I pitched in the little leagues I was no. 30 in honor of Nolan Ryan. When my pitching young days were over my jersey number was no. 8 in honor of Dickie Thon.

This is my list of numbers that have been immortalize by latinos in Major League Baseball history:

0-Rey Ordoñez
1-Luis Castillo
2-Hanley Ramírez
3-Alex Rodriguez (Seattle Mariners-Texas Rangers))
5-Albert Pujols
6-Tony Oliva
7-Ivan Rodríguez
8-Dickie Thon
9-Minnie Miñoso
10-Miguel Tejada
11-Luis Aparicio, Edgar Martinez, George Bell
12-Roberto Alomar
13-Alex Rodriguez (New York Yankees), Dave Concepcion, Omar Vizquel
14-Andres Galarraga
15-Carlos Beltran
18-Moises Alou, Omar Moreno
19-Juan Gonzalez, Bert Campaneris
20- Jorge Posada
21-Roberto Clemente, Sammy Sosa, Ruben Sierra, Carlos Delgado (New York Mets)
24-Tany Perez, Manny Ramirez, Miguel Cabrera
25-Jose Cruz, Rafael Palmeiro, Mike Lowell, Carlos Delgado (Toronto Blue Jays)
27-Juan Marichal, Vladimir Guerrero
29-Rod Carew
30-Orlando Cepeda, Dennis Martinez, Magglio Ordoñez
34-David Ortiz, Fernando Valenzuela
35-Mike Cuellar
40-Bartolo Colón
41-Victor Martínez
42-Mariano Rivera
45-Pedro Martínez, Carlos Lee. John Candelaria
46-Tony Armas Sr.
51-Bernie Williams
53-Bobby Abreu
55-Fausto Carmona
57-Francisco Rodriguez
61-Livan Hernández
63-Rafael Betancourt
74-Ugueth Urbina

MLB’ Best Latino Players Last 20 Seasons

Ivan Rodriguez.jpgESPN is celebrating 20 years of covering Major League Baseball and the network asked fans to vote for their all-time team of the last 20 seasons.

At this moment, fans are being asked to pick the winners for each position.

Not surprisingly, winning names in this national poll have been Edgar Martinez as the top DH, Albert Pujols top first baseman, Ivan Rodriguez as top catcher, and Mariano Rivera as the top closer in the last 20 years.

All players from Latin America.

For the last 23 years I have been covering the Major League Baseball beat of the Puerto Rican and Latin American players, and over that time I have seen a bunch of great players.

I’ve also seen how appealing they are to their fans. I have seen how hall-of-famers Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda, Tany Perez, Luis Aparicio, Rod Carew, and Juan Marichal are perceived as never-gone heroes in the respective towns they played in in their hey-days.

Nowadays players like Albert Pujols, Hanley Ramirez, Manny Ramirez, Johan Santana and many others are closely watched and being regarded as the No. 1 players of their respective franchises.

Quite different to ESPN’ SportsNation Poll, I will share whom I believe are the best Latino players the last 20 years. Most possibly readers will have have a different opinion, but this is my own Latino All-Star team.

Catchers-Santos Alomar Jr., Javier López, Jorge Posada, Iván Rodríguez, Benito Santiago

First Base-Miguel Cabrera, Carlos Delgado, Andrés Galarraga, Rafael Palmeiro, Albert Pujols

Second Base-Roberto Alomar, Carlos Baerga, Julio Franco

Third Base-Vinny Castilla, Mike Lowell, Alex Rodríguez

Shortstop-Hanley Ramirez, José Reyes, Miguel Tejada, Omar Vizquel

Outfielders-Bobby Abreu, Carlos Beltran, José Canseco, Juan González, Vladimir Guerrero, Magglio Ordoñez, Sammy Sosa, Bernie Williams

Pitchers-Pedro Martinez, Johan Santana

Closers-Mariano Rivera, Francisco Rodriguez

Designated Hitter-Edgar Martinez, David Ortiz

Bernie Williams: 51 Next ?


Just a little time ago here in Miami, a group of New York media reporters and myself were talking about which great Yankee’s player should be next to have his uniform’s number retired.

The immediate answer was number 2′ Derek Jeter.

The quick response is understandable. For 14 seasons the nine-time All-Star shortstop’s long list mark of honors and accolades are not doubt hall-of-fame bound. Not counting that besides Mr. Yankee Captain since 2003 he has been twice Mr. Captain of Team USA in both editions of the World Baseball Classic. Sixteen (16) pages of Jeter’s biography in the 2009 Yankee Media Guide tells it all.

Moreover his number 2 is at the present time, the only number from 1 through 9 not yet retired at Yankee Stadium’ s Monument Park.

What about 51 ? Yes, Bernie Williams. The reaction from the same group was something like he deserves it but we totally forgot about him.

In The Big Apple who should have forgotten whom in 16 seasons was one of the Mr. Yankee. He racked up from 1991-2006 batting .297, 287 homers with 1,257 RBI’s, The Barceloneta native is among  the top 15 Yankee career batting leader in 10 offensive categories. Five-Time All-Star; Four Gold Gloves; 1996 American League Championship Series MVP and 1998 American League Batting King.

At least in Borinquen who have forgotten when Williams and catcher Jorge Posada each hit home runs from both sides of the plate in 2000 in a win at Toronto. Only time in history that wo players have hit swith-home runs in the same game. That’s good history.

Back in March after the last Puerto Rico game in the World Baseball Classic the always amiable Williams gave us this wrap-up responses to the Puerto Rico Daily Sun in South Florida.

“I felt really good about playing,” Williams said. “I am my worst critic and I didn’t feel very bad about it. It took me a while to get acclimated. But after a while, I felt very encouraged. I can still play,”

“At this point, I don’t want to be the guy that tries to come back and goes to the independent leagues or the minor leagues for a couple [of] weeks,” Williams said. “I would certainly welcome the opportunity to play in the big leagues at some point, even though the window is very short right now.”

The window never open. And even though he never said  it if he’d play for a team other than the Yankees, we really knew he would have only played for the Yankees.

Nowadays Williams, 40, is on the road on his “Moving Forward” second-album jazz tour. And we well very know he still thinks he could have been in the pinstripes uniform one more time.

Just a suggestion to the Yankees organization. Next time you invite him to play a national anthem give him finally a Bernie Williams Day like any other Yankee greats and retire his number 51 forever. And be the first Puerto Rican and Latino to be in Monument Park. Jeter can join him later.

As an extra note, if this column is read in Seattle, the Mariners should finally retire Number 11′ Edgar Martínez. His honors are very long. Then someday another Mariners’ 51 , Ichiro Suzuki.

 

This column was also published by The Puerto Rico Daily Sun / MLB Notebook

Los Mejores Latinos Ultimos 20 Años en las Grandes Ligas

Por mucho tiempo se ha discutido quien es el mejor pelotero de todos los tiempos. Unos dicen Babe Ruth, otros Ted Williams o Joe DiMaggio.  La lista es larga y así mismo es la discusión sobre los mejores peloteros latinoamericanos de todos los tiempos.

De nombres como entre otros Roberto Clemente, Tany Pérez, Luis Aparicio, Rod Carew y Orlando Cepeda no se pueden dudar mucho de su grandeza ya que todos ellos están inmortalizados en el salón de los más grandes en Cooperstown.

Atras en el mes de marzo cuando estuve en el Clásico Mundial de Beisbol un día en una tertulia en Fort Myers junto a Bernie Williams y Mike Lowell vacilabamos un poco del tiempo que llevabamos en el deporte del guante y el bate y como a ellos les llaman veteranos y amigablemente “viejos” en los diamantes. Precisamente bien recuerdo cuando en 1986 tuve la oportunidad de hacerle una de las primeras entrevista como profesional a Williams y no fue hasta 1991 que hizo su debut con los Bombarderos del Bronx.

En tal tertulia ambos peloteros de origen boricua y que vistieron la franela de los Yankees de Nueva York en sus carreras coincidieron que en el caso de los periodistas deportivos parecia que los calendarios no nos pasaban por encima.

Entre año y año son sobre 20 que me han pasado por encima y desde aquel ratito se me quedó quienes eran los mejores latinos que he visto en mi carrera como cronista deportivo en el béisbol de las Grandes Ligas.

En mi carrera he visto a muchos pero la tarea de resumir en un listado los mejores latinos en los ultimos 20 años no es nada de facil pero me arrriesgo a compartir mi listado con ustedes. En la lista veran algunos ya retirados y otros más jovenes que van con buen paso. Y ellos son:

Receptores-Santos Alomar Jr., Javier López, Jorge Posada, Iván Rodríguez, Benito Santiago

Primera Base-Miguel Cabrera, Carlos Delgado, Andrés Galarraga, Rafael Palmeiro, Albert Pujols

Segunda Base-Roberto Alomar, Carlos Baerga, Julio Franco

Tercera Base-Vinny Castilla, Mike Lowell, Alex Rodriguez

Campo Corto- Hanley Ramírez, José Reyes, Miguel Tejada, Omar Vizquel

Jardineros-Bobby Abreu, Carlos Beltrán, José Canseco, Juan González, Vladimir Guerrero, Magglio Ordoñez, Sammy Sosa, Bernie Williams

Lanzadores-Pedro Martínez, Johan Santana

Relevistas-Mariano Rivera, Francisco Rodríguez

Bateador Designado-Edgar Martínez, David Ortiz

Quienes serán los proximos en los venideros años….el tiempo dirá….veremos….

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 48 other followers